NEWS

By Bighornrestorationgroup 08 May, 2016

ABSTRACT

Bighorn sheep formerly inhabited the Wind River Mountains in vast numbers and therefore played a vitally important ecological roll in the entire ecosystem. However, by 1900 many formerly abundant herds had declined to the point of near extinction. In the early 1960’s, at the behest of a concerned and insistent public, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department began restoring bighorn sheep populations in the southern Wind River Mountains. However, within the last decade the translocated bighorn sheep inhabiting Sinks Canyon and the Middle Fork of the Popo Agie River have completely died out, most likely the result of bronchopneumonia contracted from an unfortunate accidental contact with a small hobby flock of domestic sheep present near the canyon during a short four month period.  Currently only three tiny, isolated populations of bighorn sheep exist in the Little Popo Agie, North Fork of the Popo Agie, and the adjacent South Fork of the Little Wind River Watersheds. Without prompt agency intervention, the imminent extinction of these small, isolated populations is all but assured.


By Bighornrestorationgroup 09 Mar, 2016
BRG Scientific Advisory Committee Chair Jack States, committee member John Mionczynski, and Rom Smith were invited to participate in the capture, pathogen testing, and radio collaring of a number of   Bighorn   sheep   on the South Fork of the Little Wind River on the Wind River Indian Reservation.  The project was conducted under the guidance of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, tribal wildlife officials and the Wyoming G&F Dept.  G&F Department veterinarians provided pathogen testing expertise.

The radio collars placed on the
  bighorns   are at this moment providing GPS data.  The collars will be sending signals for up to six years.  This data along with the health data collected is a great first step in the hoped for return of   bighorns  to the southern Wind River Mountains. 
By Bighornrestorationgroup 09 Mar, 2016
The BRG Scientific Advisory Committee has partnered with the Fremont County Library here in Lander to create a library of books and documents pertaining to bighorn sheep ecology, health, and management.  

These books and papers are being housed in a special section of the library and will be available for in-house review. Ask the librarian about it today! 
By Bighornrestorationgroup 08 May, 2016

ABSTRACT

Bighorn sheep formerly inhabited the Wind River Mountains in vast numbers and therefore played a vitally important ecological roll in the entire ecosystem. However, by 1900 many formerly abundant herds had declined to the point of near extinction. In the early 1960’s, at the behest of a concerned and insistent public, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department began restoring bighorn sheep populations in the southern Wind River Mountains. However, within the last decade the translocated bighorn sheep inhabiting Sinks Canyon and the Middle Fork of the Popo Agie River have completely died out, most likely the result of bronchopneumonia contracted from an unfortunate accidental contact with a small hobby flock of domestic sheep present near the canyon during a short four month period.  Currently only three tiny, isolated populations of bighorn sheep exist in the Little Popo Agie, North Fork of the Popo Agie, and the adjacent South Fork of the Little Wind River Watersheds. Without prompt agency intervention, the imminent extinction of these small, isolated populations is all but assured.


By Bighornrestorationgroup 09 Mar, 2016
BRG Scientific Advisory Committee Chair Jack States, committee member John Mionczynski, and Rom Smith were invited to participate in the capture, pathogen testing, and radio collaring of a number of   Bighorn   sheep   on the South Fork of the Little Wind River on the Wind River Indian Reservation.  The project was conducted under the guidance of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, tribal wildlife officials and the Wyoming G&F Dept.  G&F Department veterinarians provided pathogen testing expertise.

The radio collars placed on the
  bighorns   are at this moment providing GPS data.  The collars will be sending signals for up to six years.  This data along with the health data collected is a great first step in the hoped for return of   bighorns  to the southern Wind River Mountains. 
By Bighornrestorationgroup 09 Mar, 2016
The BRG Scientific Advisory Committee has partnered with the Fremont County Library here in Lander to create a library of books and documents pertaining to bighorn sheep ecology, health, and management.  

These books and papers are being housed in a special section of the library and will be available for in-house review. Ask the librarian about it today! 
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